New York Times Book Reviews

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Updated: 8 hours 16 min ago

‘George Marshall,’ by Debi and Irwin Unger with Stanley Hirshson

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
A fuller picture of the revered commander whom Truman called the “greatest military man” in U.S. history.
Categories: Book Reviews

‘Leningrad: Siege and Symphony,’ by Brian Moynahan

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
Shostakovich’s composition for a besieged Leningrad.
Categories: Book Reviews

Open Book: Putin’s Power, and Cold Feet

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
Karen Dawisha’s longtime British publisher will not publish her latest, “Putin’s Kleptocracy.”
Categories: Book Reviews

Critic's Take: Spies Like Hers

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
The spy novelist Helen MacInnes portrayed Cold War intrigue with a keen understanding of the machinations of power.
Categories: Book Reviews

‘Tolstoy’s False Disciple,’ by Alexandra Popoff

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
The story of Tolstoy’s relationship with a conniving aristocrat.
Categories: Book Reviews

New Novellas About Family by Ludmilla Petrushev­skaya

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:35
In three tales, women contend with ne’er-do-well children and the pressures of communal living.
Categories: Book Reviews

Paperback Row

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:12
Paperback books of particular interest.
Categories: Book Reviews

Editors’ Choice

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 11:11
Recently reviewed books of particular interest.
Categories: Book Reviews

David Baldacci: By the Book

Wed, 11/26/2014 - 09:00
The author, most recently, of “The Escape” was a library rat growing up: “Libraries are the mainstays of democracy. The first thing dictators do when taking over a country is close all the libraries, because libraries are full of ideas.”
Categories: Book Reviews

‘Limonov,’ by Emmanuel Carrère

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 16:40
After a career as a poet, butler and media celebrity, Eduard Limonov helped organize a group of nationalist thugs.
Categories: Book Reviews

‘The Georgetown Set,’ by Gregg Herken

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 16:39
In the 1950s and ’60s, administration officials, journalists and spies encountered one another in Washington’s Georgetown.
Categories: Book Reviews

Literary Landscapes: To Russia, With Tough Love

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 16:11
Masha Gessen recounts the literary history of Moscow and describes why she’s become disillusioned with the city of her birth.






Categories: Book Reviews

Bookends: What Makes the Russian Literature of the 19th Century So Distinctive?

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 09:00
Francine Prose and Benjamin Moser discuss the great Russian writers and their approach to the human heart and soul.






Categories: Book Reviews

ArtsBeat: Neal Cassady’s Famous Lost Letter to Jack Kerouac to Be Auctioned

Mon, 11/24/2014 - 16:28
A 16,000-word letter that inspired Kerouac to rewrite “On the Road” has been found, and will be sold at auction in December.






Categories: Book Reviews

ArtsBeat: A 19th-Century-Style ‘Christmas Carol’ on the Upper East Side

Mon, 11/24/2014 - 10:52
A new performance of the Dickens Christmas classic recreates a 19th-century-style salon performance.






Categories: Book Reviews

‘Embattled Rebel,’ by James M. McPherson

Mon, 11/24/2014 - 09:36
James M. McPherson reconsiders Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president and military commander.






Categories: Book Reviews

ArtsBeat: Book Review Podcast: ‘Deep Down Dark’

Sat, 11/22/2014 - 21:02
Héctor Tobar discusses “Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free.”






Categories: Book Reviews

ArtsBeat: Daniel Handler Apologizes Over ‘Racist’ Comment at National Book Awards

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 13:46
The author, who hosted the awards ceremony Wednesday night, apologized profusely for what he described as a racist comment.






Categories: Book Reviews

Critic's Take: The End of Biography

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 12:09
How can thousand-page biographies continue to compete for the attention of readers?
Categories: Book Reviews

‘The Republic of Imagination,’ by Azar Nafisi

Fri, 11/21/2014 - 12:09
Azar Nafisi uses three classic novels as a window on American society.
Categories: Book Reviews