New York Times Book Reviews

Nonfiction: Did a Writer’s Great-Great-Grandmother Really Kill a Man? She Travels to Southern Italy to Find Out.

4 hours 28 min ago
Helene Stapinski has been haunted by the thought of her “criminal genes.” In “Murder in Matera,” she investigates her family’s past.
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: Why Did Lincoln Move So Slowly to Abolish Slavery? Because He Was a Racist, This Book Argues.

9 hours 48 min ago
Fred Kaplan’s “Lincoln and the Abolitionists” emphasizes the distance between them.
Categories: Book Reviews

The Shortlist: Four New Collections of Omnivorous Literary Criticism

9 hours 48 min ago
These writers range widely, giving free play to their personal aesthetics and their avid curiosity.
Categories: Book Reviews

Fiction: When the Fox Becomes a Friend

9 hours 48 min ago
In Paula Cocozza’s hypnotic first novel, “How to Be Human,” a lonely woman strikes up a relationship with a feral fox.
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: What a World Tour of Tax Codes Can Teach the U.S. About How to Reform Its Own

9 hours 48 min ago
In “A Fine Mess,” T. R. Reid cites examples from Estonia to New Zealand of how tax redesigns can drive economic success.
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: Where Do Babies Come From? And Why Did It Take Scientists So Long to Find Out?

9 hours 48 min ago
For centuries, the mysteries of egg and sperm eluded even the greatest minds, Edward Dolnick writes in “The Seeds of Life.”
Categories: Book Reviews

Fiction: Fathers and Sons — and Maybe Two More Sons

9 hours 48 min ago
Susan Rieger’s novel “The Heirs” pits an upper-crust New York family against two young men claiming a piece of the patriarch’s estate.
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: 26 Missing Genes and the Exuberant Affections They Lead To

9 hours 48 min ago
Jennifer Latson’s “The Boy Who Loved Too Much” follows the story of a child with Williams syndrome, a genetic condition, who meets the world with unshakeable affection.
Categories: Book Reviews

Fiction: A Nuanced Novel Examines the Mystery of Radicalization

9 hours 48 min ago
Laleh Khadivi’s novel “A Good Country” poses the question: How does a studious American boy, the child of prosperous Iranian immigrants, fall into radical Islam?
Categories: Book Reviews

Paperback Row

9 hours 48 min ago
Six new paperbacks of interest this week.
Categories: Book Reviews

Letters to the Editor

9 hours 48 min ago
Readers respond to Senator Al Franken’s memoir, whether the internet is turning users “lonelier and lonelier” and debate the cultural appropriation.
Categories: Book Reviews

Crime: Unmasking Magic and Murder in the Best New Crime

9 hours 48 min ago
Alchemists and archaeologists are among the characters in this week’s mystery column. Also crooked cops and a very sad, very dead homeless man.
Categories: Book Reviews

Books of The Times: In ‘Memory’s Last Breath,’ Remembering Life, Before It’s Too Late

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 15:35
Gerda Saunders tries to analyze her dementia as dispassionately as possible in her new book.
Categories: Book Reviews

9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 14:38
Suggested reading from editors at The New York Times.
Categories: Book Reviews

Newsbook: 3 Books That Help Explain American-Cuban Relations

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 10:18
Here are three books that help explain the United States’ fraught historical relationship with Cuba.
Categories: Book Reviews

By the Book: Emma Straub: By the Book

Thu, 06/22/2017 - 04:00
The author of “Modern Lovers” keeps her youth on a shelf: “There are books I loved in my teens and 20s that I would not love now, but it’s still nice to see them there, as a reminder of a person I used to be.”
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: Two New Books Offer Advice for the Socially Awkward

Wed, 06/21/2017 - 04:00
Ty Tashiro (in “Awkward”) and Alan Alda (in “If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?”) say people can learn to interact more effectively.
Categories: Book Reviews

Fiction: Skaters, Beaches and a Drug-Smuggling Stewardess in a Novel of the ’70s

Wed, 06/21/2017 - 04:00
In Daniel Riley’s debut novel, “Fly Me,” a young Vassar grad with a need for speed lights up a laid-back California town.
Categories: Book Reviews

Nonfiction: A Powerful, Disturbing History of Residential Segregation in America

Tue, 06/20/2017 - 04:00
In “The Color of Law,” Richard Rothstein argues that government at all levels and in all branches abetted residential segregation, and the effects endure.
Categories: Book Reviews

Match Book: Dear Match Book: What Audiobooks Will Liven Up My Summer Road Trips?

Tue, 06/20/2017 - 04:00
For long trips with adult passengers and shorter trips with kids, our columnist recommends great audiobooks to hold drivers’ attention.
Categories: Book Reviews